Wednesday, October 15, 2008
This sounds familiar
From my church history textbook:
"The Reformation achieved great popular success because it satisfied, or promised to satisfy, the needs of many people who earnestly desired the consolations of the Christian religion. These people were not rapacious foes of the medieval church; they were sincere seekers after salvation who looked to the church for succor and, not finding it there, turned against the traditional religion and its representatives with all the anger of disillusioned love."
Very much the same thing could be said about emergents these days.
 
posted by Mike Clawson at 1:35 PM | Permalink |


4 Comments:


At 10/15/2008 02:55:00 PM, Blogger Kester

Indeed. This could be said of a lot of us, emergent or not. It reminds me of this quote:

I have seen sheep pent up in a lean pasture, looking through the crevices of their enclosure at a flock grazing on a rich field at liberty—I have seen their manifestations of anxiety to be with them, in their bleating and running along the fence to find a place of escape. At length one made the leap and many followed.

 

At 10/15/2008 04:24:00 PM, Blogger Mike Clawson

Good quote Kester. Of course this is the point where the defenders of the status quo will remind us that there are wolves out there and that we're all a lot safer if we just stay inside the pen and stop thinking about what's outside.

 

At 10/16/2008 09:38:00 AM, Anonymous Karl

"These people were not rapacious foes of the medieval church; they were sincere seekers after salvation who looked to the church for succor and, not finding it there, turned against the traditional religion and its representatives with all the anger of disillusioned love.""

During my own lifetime I can think of at least a few groups to whom this would apply:

People in mainline and Catholic churches experiencing the charismatic renewal movement of the 70's, many of whom stayed in their denominations but many of whom also migrated to charismatic evangelical denominations.

"Evangelicals on the Canterbury Trail" as described by Bob Weber - more loosely meaning (to me) young evangelicals who look to the Anglican, Orthodox or Catholic traditions to find historical connectedness and rootedness, and depth of worship, that they find lacking in the evangelical churches of their youth.

People from mainline or liturgical churches passing the previously mentioned group in the opposite lane as it were, as they leave what they experienced as dead formalism for what they perceive to be a more alive, life-changing spirituality within evangelicalism.

Emergents - of various streams, for varying reasons as you have written about.

 

At 10/16/2008 04:42:00 PM, Blogger Kester

They'd be right to say there are wolves. Which is why we need to follow the Good Shepherd, not why we need to stay in the pen.

 

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